Plants & Trees & Plant of The Month

Plants & Trees

Our new and enhanced outdoor plant area carries a comprehensive range of trees, conifers, shrubs, roses, perennials, climbers, alpines, heathers, bedding plants, aquatic plants, grasses, fruit trees and statement plants for that instant impact in your garden.

Our plant area is set out in alphabetical order for easy garden planning. We have published our own plant guide leaflets to show you what we have available on offer. They are designed to assist you in achieving all year round colour.

Please find in store 28 leaflets for you to pick up free of charge.

We are proud to supply top quality plants at very reasonable prices and a one year guarantee with proof of purchase*.

We offer a wide range of summer and winter hanging baskets to enhance your garden.

Please visit our friendly plant area team for all your garden questions and if you are not able to find the plant you are looking for, then we will do our up most to source our suppliers, to provide you with the plant you're after.

Anne Covell

Plants & Trees Manager

Hardy Plant Guarantee - Our hardy outdoor plants are covered by a 12 month guarantee, which begins from the day of purchase. Proof of purchase in the form of our till receipt must be produced. A plant label alone does not qualify. We will replace the plant or provide a full refund. The guarantee does not cover sale or discounted items. The guarantee does not cover plants that have not been properly cared for. The plant must finally be returned to the garden centre for inspection.

Plant of The Month For February - Roses with 20% Off Marked Price throughout February (While Stocks Last)

Roses are one of the most popular garden plants. These beauties come in a range of colours, many with scented blooms, and they can be grown in borders, containers, over arches, pergolas and as groundcover. They are easy to grow and live for a long time, if looked after.

Queen of Sweden Credit: RHS/Advisory.
Quick facts
Common name Rose
Latin name Rosa
Group Shrubs, climbers, ramblers and groundcover plants
Flowering time Summer and autumn
Planting time Late autumn to early spring
Height and spread 30cm-9m (1ft-30ft) height and spread
Aspect There are roses for sun and shade
Hardiness Mostly fully hardy, but some are only frost hardy
Difficulty Easy
Jump to
Pruning and trainingPropagationCultivar SelectionProblems
Cultivation notes
Roses will grow in almost any soil, as long as it is well-drained. Incorporating some well-rotted garden compost or manure into the planting area will get your roses off to a flying start.

There are so many different roses, there is possibly one for any spot in the garden, from a container on a sunny patio, to a climber for a north-facing wall.

Roses are deep rooted plants that, once established, can survive on the moisture present naturally in the soil. But, in the first few years after planting, and where the soil is especially dry, thorough watering is recommended. Wet the top 25cm (10in) of the soil every 10 days in prolonged dry spells to give the best results.

Roses in containers need to be watered so that the compost never dries out, but is never soggy; this could be every day in hot weather. For more on selecting suitable roses for container growing, see the links below.

Feeding
Roses are hungry plants that respond well to generous feeding:

Sprinkle general-purpose or rose fertiliser around roses in spring at 70g per sq m (2oz per sq yd)
Mulch with rotted organic matter, ideally rotted manure, immediately after adding fertiliser. Keep the mulch clear of the rose stems, leaving a 10cm (4in) gap between the mulch and stems.
Feed roses in containers every fortnight from mid-spring until late summer with general-purpose liquid fertiliser until flower buds form and then with high-potassium liquid fertiliser, such as tomato feed
Weeding around roses
Roses have roots that come up near the soil surface, so hoeing is best avoided or at least kept very shallow.

Hand weeding and mulching will control annual weeds, but perennial ones may need to be removed individually with a fork. Mulching and planting groundcover plants will help to keep roses weed-free.

Weedkillers based on glyphosate and other systemic chemicals might be taken up by rose suckers and can cause severe damage to roses. Contact weedkillers are less risky.